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Waltham Forest Council Schools

I never teach my pupils; I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn. - Albert Einstein


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wfcwHead teachers plan own league tables
13 August 2014
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Head teachers in England have put forward plans to publish their own school league tables. This would be separate from the official performance data published by the government, which is currently used to generate school rankings
The heads say they want to present an independent and more inclusive view of schools - arguing that it will be more objective than the measures chosen by the government.
They argue that the way that league tables are now assembled is too closely aligned to promoting government policy.
Victorian exam system fails pupils, says Eton headmaster
5 August 2014
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Tony Little, headmaster of Eton :Too much focus on tests and exams is damaging education in England Exams in England are "unimaginative, little changed from Victorian times" and fail to ready pupils for the modern workplace, warns Eton's headmaster. Too much focus on grades means exams can eclipse an all-round education, argues Tony Little, in the Radio Times.
wfcwBritish Chambers of Commerce
2 April 2014
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John Longworth, director-general of the BCC accused the political class of failing young people, in a scathing attack on the education system which has ‘wasted human capital’.:  Britain needs politicians ‘to be more economically literate and business orientated’.
Education, education, education' – what a meaningless phrase this proved to be, he said.
Accusing some schools, colleges and universities of ‘losing the plot’, Longworth said: ‘Preparing this generation for the British workforce is too important to the economy for us to ignore.’.
 
news school reports CARE lgbt support childrens services
Top school reports
Ofsted 2001 - Waltham Forest Education was a mess.
An Ofsted inspection listed five failings, including not doing enough to raise standards in secondary schools, and not giving sufficient help to schools with behaviour problems. Former Ofsted chief Chris Woodhead claimed that Waltham Forest Education had a "culture of failure and hopelessness."
Ofsted2011 - WALTHAM Forest Council's children and young people services department is one of the worst in the country, according to watchdog Ofsted Mission Grove Children's Centre2012 - Inspectors said the situation at Mission Grove Children's Centre, in Buxton Road, Walthamstow, was so confusing they had to ask the council "to immediately clarify who is in charge.
NutshellWaltham Forest school reports
Handsworth Pre-School was improved since its 'satisfactory' rating in 2009
24 October 2014
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A pre-school previously deemed satisfactory has been judged as 'good' by Ofsted.
Lisa Smith, the leader of Handsworth Pre-School, based at the United Reform Church in Malvern Avenue, Highams Park, has praised staff who "worked extremely hard" to make improvements.
Inspector Jill Nugent visited the pre-school on September 17.
 
Noor Ul Islam Pre-School in Leyton graded as Outstanding by Ofsted
7 October 2014
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A school run by an Islamic charity has been awarded top marks by Ofsted after inspectors were wowed by both staff and pupils on their latest visit.
The school in Leyton High Road was graded as outstanding in every category after a visit in September.  The inspection was prompted by the school’s move to an adjacent property.
Inspector Jennifer Forbes said: “Staff have a thorough understanding of the Early Years Foundation Stage and an exceptional awareness of the way that children learn. As a result, children are making excellent progress in their learning and development.
 
Emmanuel Community School's leadership and management classed as 'outstanding' by Ofsted inspector

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The Emmanuel Community School, based at the former site of St Mary's Church of England school in The Drive, Walthamstow, was rated good with outstanding leadership and management after a visit by a inspectors prior to the summer holidays.
 
Willow Brook Primary School back in special measures after Ofsted inspection
8 September 2014
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A primary school with a history of failings has been heavily criticised after its first inspection as an academy. Willow Brook Primary School Academy in Church Road, Leyton, has been placed back into special measures – just a year after it was taken out. A report found the school as ‘inadequate’ in every category, criticising safety, learning standards and student behaviour.
 
Henry Maynard primary school loses its 'outstanding' status
4 September 2014
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Inspectors found assistants are not always supporting pupils learning effectively and teachers do not consistently ensure pupils are responsive to mark comments.
 
Selwyn Primary School in Highams Park has been rated as good from requiring improvements
25th July 2014
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Selwyn Primary School has over 600 pupils and was told by Ofsted in September 2012 it had failed to meet basic standards in administering medication and recording pupils attendance.
 
Further improvements needed at struggling Kelmscott School, which has the lowest GCSE pass rate in Waltham Forest
3rd June 2014
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Just 32 per cent of pupils at Kelmscott School in Markhouse Road, Walthamstow, achieved five good GCSEs or above last year
The school with the lowest GCSE results in Waltham Forest has been praised for making good progress, but told further improvements must be made.
Inspector Carmen Rodney said: “You and other senior leaders have been very open about the reasons for the decline in 2013 results in English.
 
Woodside Primary Academy in Walthamstow has been taken out of special measures
19th May 2014
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Woodside Primary Academy has been classified as 'requiring improvement', after being placed under special measures in 2012. However, the school, where more than two-thirds of children speak English as a second language, has now been praised for raising standards.
 
Davies Lane Primary School in Leytonstone given 'outstanding' grade by Ofsted
8th May 2014
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A primary school has been awarded the highest possible grading by Ofsted inspectors.
Teachers were praised by lead inspector Kath Beck as ‘highly effective and inspirational’ and students were said to made ‘exceptional’ progress.
 
South Grove Primary School in Walthamstow praised by Ofsted inspectors
1st May 2014
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School leaders have been described as ‘exceptional’ in a report on a school which has previously failed to impress inspectors from education watchdog Ofsted.
South Grove Primary in Ringwood Road, Walthamstow has received praise from inspectors who have now graded it as ‘good’ with ‘outstanding’ elements.
 

Our Lady and St George's Catholic Primary School in Walthamstow has been told to improve by Ofsted
24th April 2014 
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Our Lady and St George’s Catholic Primary School in Shernhall Street, Walthamstow has been given the ‘requires improvement’ grade by the education watchdog for the second time.
A report confirms that the school which was formed by the amalgamation of an infant and junior school in 2010 is falling behind national standards.

 
Walthamstow School for Girls nominated for two national awards.
23rd April 2014
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Walthamstow School for Girls has qualified for two awards from SSAT, an independent membership organisation which focuses on the role of teachers and their role in shaping children’s education and has been invited to receive their award at a regional celebration ceremony hosted by SSAT at The St Marylebone CE School in London on 06 May.
Meryl Davies, Headteacher of Walthamstow School for Girls said that she is thrilled having also achieved a good Ofsted report.
She said: “We are delighted to have gained yet further national recognition for the contribution we make to changing the life chances of young people in Walthamstow.”
Sue Williamson, Chief Executive of SSAT said that the school is ‘leading’ in the field for improvement in the run up to GCSE exams.
 
Walthamstow School for Girls has been downgraded following an inspection in January
17th March 2014
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Headteacher claims system of measuring performance and quality has changed radically
A girls’ school with a long track record of being rated outstanding has been downgraded.
Walthamstow School for Girls, in Church Hill, Walthamstow, has been classed as 'good' in a report published by Ofsted last week following an inspection in January.
 
Ofsted: Leytonstone School in Colworth Road said to need improvement
4th March 2014
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The interim headteacher of a Leytonstone comprehensive school said he is disappointed with the results of recent Ofsted inspections but has promised improvements. Leytonstone School in Colworth Road was told it needed improvement following an assessment in January because of poor GCSE results and teaching, as well as issues around leadership.
 
Ofsted report says Kelmscott School secondary school needs improvement
13th January 2014
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Kelmscott School in Walthamstow deemed to ‘require improvement’ by Ofsted.   Headteacher insists there is no need for concern. After inspections in December the Markhouse Road secondary school was said to have “not yet consistently good” teaching and students’ attitudes to learning were reported as “too passive”.
 
Staff at Leytonstone Community Pre-school celebrate a highly complimentary Ofsted inspection report
11th January 2014
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The Leytonstone Community Pre-school, formerly known as The Green Man Pre-School, in Lister Road was rated ‘good’ at the end of last year. Staff were recognised as delivering a good quality of teaching and having high expectations of their children, as well as being “skilled at providing the activities that effectively support their learning and progress”.
 
Pre-school previously reported as 'inadequate' makes vast improvements
23rd December 2013
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Rising Stars Pre School in High Road, Leyton, has been given a ‘good’ status following an inspection in November.
Director Arvinder Brar, 32 is very happy with the recently published report.   He said:  We are all very happy with Friday’s report. It has been a lot of hard work and training for all the staff and management, and they have all put in so much effort to improve the standards. “The standard at the pre-school has improved vastly, and I would also like to thank the support of the local councillors.”
 
St Saviour's Church of England Primary School which was in special measures three years ago has been praised by Ofsted
10th December 2013
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St Saviour's Church of England Primary School, in Verulam Avenue, Walthamstow, was rated as a good school with outstanding leadership after an inspection in November
 
Primary school teaching told to 'rapidly' improve
29th November 2013
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Downsell Primary School, on Downsell Road in Leyton, was told its teaching is not consistently good and pupils from minority ethnic backgrounds do not make enough progress in writing and mathematics.
 
Improvement noted at 'failing' Thomas Gamuel Primary School
7th November 2013
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Thomas Gamuel Primary School in Walthamstow was placed in special measures in April 2012 and is said to be benefiting from new headteacher.
 
George Mitchell School headteacher says school should have been rated 'good' by Ofsted inspector's visit in October.
5th November 2013
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Claire Kirwin, acting headteacher at George Mitchell School in Farmer Road, Leyton, responding to the report published the day before last week’s half term, said yesterday that inspectors did not see the real quality of the school.
 
George Mitchell rated 'satisfactory' after previous 'good' rating
30th October 2013
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The report said acting headteacher Claire Kirwin was well supported by her leadership team and had restored staff morale at the school, which is one of the borough's most deprived areas. It added that most pupils were now no longer underachieving, while some are achieving well.
 
Frederick Bremer school has been told it requires improvement
18th October 2013
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Ofsted praised school for progress made since the arrival of new headteacher, Jenny Smith. Inspectors said exam results and literacy levels must improve.
 
‘Outstanding’ primary school expands to second site in Walthamstow
4th October 2013
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Hundreds of thousands needed to deal with school admissions error
25th September 2013
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Walthamstow Academy's results have improved every year since opening in 2006
22nd August 2013
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Leyton Sixth Form College enjoys record breaking A level results
15th August 2013
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Busy Bees nursery in Walthamstow is currently rated by Ofsted as Satisfactory
2nd August 2013
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Leyton's Lammas School and Sports College celebrates good Ofsted rating
25th June 2013
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South Grove Primary School in Walthamstow awarded for family learning scheme
11th June 2013
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Walthamstow Academy wins further accolades
7th June 2013
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DfE defends decision to approve only one new primary free school in borough
3rd June 2013
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New free schools 'fail to address primary school places shortfall'
30th May 2013
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Sybourn Primary School consulting over move to academy
30th May 2013
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Walthamstow Academy bosses to open new primary free school
22nd May 2013
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Second newly approved free school, Oasis Academy, announced
22nd May 2013
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Four new free schools approved in Waltham Forest by Education Secretary Michael Gove
22nd May 2013
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Head teacher of Chingford C of E Infants School in King’s Road praised by Ofsted
after being deemed just satisfactory in 2011

21st May 2013
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Thomas Gamuel School in Colchester Road, Walthamstow, no longer failing but 'still needs to improve'
19th May 2013
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Chingford head teacher praised by Ofsted for work to improve school
16th May 2013
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Joseph Clarke School, in Vincent Road, Highams Park, rated good by Ofsted
15th May 2013
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Normanhurst School in Station Road, Chingford, achieved the highest rating in its March inspection by the Independent Schools Inspectorate.
8th May 2013
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Chingford Church of England Infants’ School has been rated good by Ofsted following an inspection.
24th April 2013
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'Failing' Riverley Primary School, in Park Road, Leyton, is improving says Ofsted
18th April 2013
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Newport Children's Centre, in Dawlish Road, Leyton, praised by Ofsted
15th April 2013
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Leyton Sixth Form College named best in London for sport
24th April 2013
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Delight at good Ofsted rating for Buxton School in Leytonstone
15th April 2013
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Bright Kids Day Nursery at Leyton Asda rated good by Ofsted
14th April 2013
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Bright Kids Day Nursery at Leyton Asda rated good by Ofsted
14th April 2013
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Bright Kids Day Nursery, which is based at the Leyton Asda shopping complex, was praised by the education watchdog for its stimulating surroundings, safe environment and good staff.  The partnerships between staff and parents were also highlighted.
The report said: "Children are provided with a wide range of stimulating activities that cover all areas of learning.  "Children are progressing well because staff have a sound knowledge of the children's starting points, they plan and extend play activities according to their individual interests and needs."
Ofsted said the nursery was not yet outstanding because staff needed to use children's home languages more when overseeing their play and learning.
 
Connaught school strikeConnaught School for Girls, in Leytonstone, becomes an academy after fierce union battle
5th February 2013
A high-achieving school has finally become an academy after a long battle with its unionised staff.

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) held ten days of strikes at Connaught School for Girls, in Leytonstone, last year in protest at the plans.
Headteacher Ann Betts said the move was necessary to prevent Waltham Forest Council from merging it with another school, and she also said Connaught would be £97,000 better off as a result.
Connaught school strikeTeachers strike at Leytonstone school as last-ditch talks fail
7th November 2012
TEACHERS at a popular all-girls school have started a two day strike after last-ditch talks failed.
National Union of Teachers (NUT) members at Connaught School for Girls in Leytonstone are holding the walk-out in protest at its bid to become an academy.
It is the third strike over the issue to close the school this term.
Yesterday (Tuesday) Connaught management and union representatives met with independent conciliatory body Acas in an attempt to resolve the crisis, but failed to reach an agreement.
Waltham Forest NUT secretary Steve White said: "It's very likely we will see more strikes in future.
"The union will support whatever its members want to do and I think it is almost certain."
Guardian
 
Connaught school strikeSchool & council row over academy plans
23rd October 2012
A headteacher has said she does not trust Waltham Forest Council to safeguard the future of her school – as a row over its bid to become an academy deepens.
Mission Grove Children's CentreMission Grove Children's Centre in Walthamstow rated 'inadequate' by Ofsted.
9th August 2012
Inspectors said the situation at Mission Grove Children's Centre, in Buxton Road, Walthamstow, was so confusing they had to ask the council "to immediately clarify who is in charge”.
 
WF GuardianThree-quarters of children get into first choice school
2nd March 2013
More than three quarters of children were handed a place at their parents' first choice secondary school in Waltham Forest. A total of 78 per cent of parents successfully applied through Pan-London Co-ordinated Admissions.
Guardian
 
Lyndon LynchDisappointment over school's sports hall u-turn
19th March 2013
 A retired teacher has spoken of his disappointment after a school renamed a sports hall in his honour - but then changed its mind due to "sponsorship" reasons.
Highly-respected Lyndon Lynch, 60, said he was delighted and surprised when the accolade was announced at Leytonstone School in Colworth Road. During his 11 years there PE teacher Mr Lynch had helped the school to various sporting successes and was instrumental in securing £20,000 in funding for its fitness suite and a £4million grant which led to the sports hall being built in the first place.
But just days after the renaming ceremony a newly-installed plaque with his name was quietly removed and all references to his name dropped. Mr Lynch, who now helps run the East London Leisure Trust charity and is head coach of the FA's cerebral palsy England team and its Paralympic Team GB squad, said: "I was very touched by the honour. "I told all my colleagues in the FA, but then the next week I found out second-hand that the school was going back on it. It was embarrassing. "I was shocked. I was very disappointed, especially when I didn't even receive an explanation."
Mr Lynch, of Barking, had been promoted to assistant headteacher and director of sport by the time he retired and it is thought that head Luke Burton personally approved the renaming of the hall. She told The Voice: "Due to issues regarding sponsorship with our sports centre, we were forced to remove Mr Lynch’s dedication plaque, along with others.
Mr Lynch has spoken out in frustration that five months after he retired he has still not been contacted by the school to explain the situation.
Guardian
 

 
 
lsaLondon Schools Atlas

The London Schools Atlas provides a uniquely detailed and comprehensive picture of London schools, current patterns of attendance and potential future demand for school places.
The Atlas is part of the Mayor's programme of initiatives aimed at driving up standards in education and ensuring there are enough places for all children in the city.
Find out about school places in your borough at the London Schools Atlas.
Covering primary and secondary provision, including academies and free schools, the Atlas uses data to illustrate current patterns of demand for school places at a pan-London level for the first time, rather than within boroughs alone. It also gives projected changes in demand from 2012/13 to 2017/18, helping provide an indicative picture of where pressure on places might be in the future.
http://www.london.gov.uk/webmaps/lsa/
Top news
wfcwGeorge Mitchell Primary School parents form the first PTA
Photo: Charmaine Manning and Cicely-May
16 September 2014
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Charmaine Manning, 37, of Byron Road, who has two children at the school, said: “FAST was absolutely wonderful. When you are picking your child up in the playground you don't get much of a chance to talk to the other parents. “This was a great chance for us to get to know each other and build a relationship with parents and teachers.
“I was always mindful that our school did not have a PTA. Without parents there is no school. I am very passionate about community and this is our community school.”
Headteacher Saeed Hussain said: “The impact that FAST had on the school has been phenomenal. Not only does it bring parents together but it also has a hugely positive impact on the children.”
 
wfcwEngland is one of the most unequal countries for children’s reading levels, second in the EU only to Romania.
8 September 2014
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A report has found that poor reading 'could cost UK £32bn in growth by 2025'
Campaign links literacy failings with joblessness, as authors, charities and CBI unite to improve reading standards
 
wfcwPoverty inquiry finds growing inequality in schools
31 August 2014
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Gulf between children from low- and high-income families is starker than ever, leading to social isolation and bullying
The Children's Commission on Poverty, an 18-month inquiry that is due to report to the government in the coming weeks, has heard that classrooms across the country are witnessing a growing crisis in which the gulf between children from low- and high-income families is starker than ever.
 
wfcwTwo teachers from George Mitchell School will be the new faces of an education campaign
7th July 2014
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Pupils from George Mitchell School in Leyton believe that their teachers are the most 'inspirational' in the borough.
Martin Stafford and Joel Ince, both from George Mitchell School in Leyton, will be seen on adverts at bus stops and underground stations around the borough.
They were named as ‘inspirational’ by their pupils and will soon be the new faces of a campaign to celebrate schools in Waltham Forest. They were
 
wfcwControversial 'merger' of Newport Primary and Dawlish primary schools in Leyton
8 July 2014
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Parents concerned over the proposed union of two schools have been urged to take part in a public consultation.  
Cllr Mark Rusling, has backed the plan to pull together Dawlish School in Jesse Road, Leyton, and nearby Newport Primary in Newport Road, to form a ‘hard federation’ under one senior management team.
 
wfcwPoor white pupils 'need best teachers and long days'
18 June 2014
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Lost 'bedrock'
Prof Alison Wolf, from King's College London, highlighted the link between concentrations of underachievement in school and where traditional industrial jobs had disappeared.
"A lot of the careers and jobs that were the bedrock of white working-class family life for many decades and generations have vanished and have not been well replaced," she said.
Committee chairman Graham Stuart said working-class parents might not realise how much the labour market had changed - and that their children would face a tough future if they failed to achieve in school.
 
wfcwEmpty classrooms expose flaws in private colleges boom
21 May 2014
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College called 'the ATM' by students who believe they can obtain loans of up to £11K a year and then not show up
wfcwWatchdog to investigate private colleges' potential misuse of millions
22 May 2014
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Margaret Hodge calls in audit office after Guardian reveals colleges offer access to loans for students who don't attend.
 
wfcwBritish Chambers of Commerce
2 April 2014
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John Longworth, director-general of the BCC accused the political class of failing young people, in a scathing attack on the education system which has ‘wasted human capital’.:  Britain needs politicians ‘to be more economically literate and business orientated’.
Education, education, education' – what a meaningless phrase this proved to be, he said.
Accusing some schools, colleges and universities of ‘losing the plot’, Longworth said: ‘Preparing this generation for the British workforce is too important to the economy for us to ignore.’.
wfcwMichael Gove calls for end to illiteracy 'within generation'
7 June 2014
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In a speech to a think tank, he outlined plans to save lives that are "wasted" due to a lack of basic skills.
wfcw Androulla Vassiliou,
Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth

"I want to encourage reading in school, at home, on buses, on trains, in the street. We need to address illiteracy wherever and in whatever form it occurs to give young people a better future"
Nutshell Gove: End illiteracy 'within generation'
7 June 2014
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The education secretary has set out his intention to end illiteracy and innumeracy within a generation.
Michael Gove is understood to want this commitment included in the next Conservative manifesto.
In a speech to a think tank, he outlined plans to save lives that are "wasted" due to a lack of basic skills.
He also said money should be deducted from child benefit payments for parents who allow children to truant then refuse to pay fines.
Mr Gove's strategy for making sure all children learn to read and write is likely to be included in a draft of the manifesto submitted to the prime minister by No 10's policy unit head Jo Johnson, The Times reports.

'Ready to learn'

Children only have one chance at education. We can't let them miss out on its transformative effect” - Michael Gove Education secretary

Around 15% of children leave primary school in England without basic levels of reading, writing and maths, the newspaper says.
Mr Gove also spoke of schools that were "setting children up to fail" by setting low expectations, providing "dumbed-down courses" and refusing to think of them as "intellectually curious and capable of greatness".
He told the centre-right think tank Policy Exchange: "I believe we have to embrace reform, lean in to the future, set standards higher than ever before."
As well as stressing the importance of raising standards in schools, Mr Gove said parents had to take responsibility for their children's behaviour.
About 20,000 truancy fines for parents go unpaid each year
He said he wanted to tackle those who "don't play their part in ensuring children attend school ready to learn".
In March government data showed record numbers of parents had been issued with truancy fines as the numbers of persistent truants fell.

'Face responsibilities'
Mr Gove wants to deduct money from child benefit payments if parents refuse to pay such fines.
The proposal was originally suggested in 2011 by Charlie Taylor, the government's education adviser on school discipline, but was blocked by the Liberal Democrats.
Although local authorities have the power to pursue parents for payment, many do not do so because of the cost. Some 20,000 fines are unpaid each year.
Mr Gove said: "Critically, we need to tackle the root causes of truancy and misbehaviour.
"Children only have one chance at education. We can't let them miss out on its transformative effect.
"We need to ensure every child is in school, benefitting from great teaching in every classroom, every school day.
"That is why we've tightened the rules on attendance and absence figures are down.
"But there's more to do. We need to ensure that those parents who don't play their part in ensuring their children attend school, ready to learn and showing respect for their teacher, face up to their responsibilities."
"We need to ensure every child is in school, benefitting from great teaching in every classroom, every school day. "That is why we've tightened the rules on attendance and absence figures are down. "But there's more to do. We need to ensure that those parents who don't play their part in ensuring their children attend school, ready to learn and showing respect for their teacher, face up to their responsibilities."

Youth Opportunities Initiative
 
wfcwSchool where all pupils will be taught English as a foreign language: And that includes the ones who ARE English
24 March 2014
Native English speakers are a minority at 314-pupil City of Leeds School. The head teacher says many students are not even literate in own language Georgiana Sale says: 'Sometimes we are the first to put a pen in their hand.' All students will be taught English as a foreign language to raise standards
nutshellThe head teacher says many students are not even literate in own language
24 March 2014
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  • Native English speakers are a minority at 314-pupil City of Leeds School
  • The head teacher says many students are not even literate in own language
  • Georgiana Sale says: 'Sometimes we are the first to put a pen in their hand'
  • All students will be taught English as a foreign language to raise standards
  • The community secondary is judged to 'require improvement' by Ofsted
  • Largest ethnic groups are of Pakistani, Czech, Roma and Traveller heritage

A school with pupils from more than 50 countries is to teach them all English as a foreign language.
City of Leeds comprehensive, which has been transformed by the arrival of large numbers of migrants, is thought to be the first in the country to take the extraordinary step.
At the last count it had on its books 55 nationalities and 50 languages or dialects, from Czech to Urdu.

The multi-ethnic City of Leeds School is to teach English as a foreign language to all of its 314 pupils
The school's head, Georgiana Sale, hopes giving the pupils a better grounding in English will boost results

Pupils at the comprehensive come from nations around the world, and a minority are native English speakers
The new class will be compulsory for the 15 per cent of pupils who are native English speakers.
Georgiana Sale, who is the headteacher, said they would gain as much as foreigners because their skills were so poor.
Giving a sobering overview of the problems faced by her staff, she said: ‘Many of our pupils are not only new to English but they are not even literate in their own language.
‘In some cases we are the first people to put a pen in their hand.’
She said she believed her school was the first to teach English as a foreign language to all its pupils.
‘The closest thing I could find was a school in London where a lot of pupils come from diplomatic circles with all the embassies nearby,’ she said.
‘That is obviously very different to us. We are proud to be a multi-cultural school and will continue to encourage new ideas to help us to be a supportive and encouraging learning environment where all pupils are given the same chances to learn.
‘Education is about giving children what they need and so we have asked ourselves: What do our children need?’

Mrs Sale, described as having 'boundless energy' by Ofsted, wants to raise standards at her school
The headmistress said her pupils' progress at GCSE level was being hampered by their poor English

But Andrew Carter, the Tory opposition leader on Leeds City Council, condemned the move. ‘I don’t see how it’s going to be of any use to these young people who will need to be employed to not have English as their first language,’ he said.
‘To teach the national language as a foreign language seems to me to be almost throwing the towel in.
‘The prime requisite of educating people of different nationalities who are currently living here and could be living here for the rest of their lives is they learn to speak English.
'It would appear to me that is going to be a secondary consideration and it can’t be.’
UKIP leader Nigel Farage said ‘an open door on immigration’ was to blame for English becoming a second language for so many.
He added: ‘I am just absolutely appalled we are allowing this to happen. It is just increasing division in our society.’
From next term 50 minutes a week will be spent teaching English to every pupil ‘as an additional language’.
The largest group is of Pakistani heritage and an Ofsted inspection a year ago reported that ‘a significant number of students from Roma and Traveller backgrounds have joined.’
The 314 pupils come from across Europe, Asia and Africa.
Staff speaking a wide variety of languages have been hired to help the school function properly.
Many teachers are relying on a ‘rusty O-level’ to teach foreign languages to primary school pupils, according to a study.
Just six months before a new duty is imposed to teach languages at the schools, researchers found that teachers are often just ‘a page or two ahead’ of the children in the textbooks they are using.
In a quarter of primaries, not a single teacher has a languages qualification higher than a  GCSE or O-level.
The research  also found that language learning  is in ‘deep crisis’ in sixth-forms amid perceptions that marking  of language A-levels is ‘harsh’  and ‘erratic’.
Teachers told researchers they were happiest giving pupils songs, single words and short phrases and struggled when it came to tackling grammar, correct pronunciation, reading and writing.
The findings are published by the CfBT Education Trust in conjunction with the British Council.
Work ahead: Many of the children at the school have only arrived in Britain in the last four years

 
better schoolsenl image - September 2013
As part of our drive to create a better place to live we are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future. To accommodate an increase in demand for primary school places and provide decent school buildings we are carrying out work to some primary schools in the borough as part of a multi-million investment programme.
NutshellWe are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future
September 2013
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Waltham Forest News

As part of our drive to create a better place to live we are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future. To accommodate an increase in demand for primary school places and provide decent school buildings we are carrying out work to some primary schools in the borough as part of a multi-million investment programme.
Works will vary at each school and range from major construction work, such as extensions, to small adaptations to existing buildings. Twenty-two schools will receive some form of building work, these include:
  • Buxton Primary School in Leytonstone has undergone internal improvements to the classroom area and has more toilets
  • To cater for additional pupil places George Mitchell Primary School in Leyton is modifying the building internally to create an additional classroom
  • Parkside Primary School in Chingford has also benefited from internal changes to increase classroom space
  • Major construction work is taking place at St Saviours C of E Primary School in Walthamstow. Pupils will benefit from a new reception class, medical room, kitchen, hall and library

As part of Waltham Forest's secondary school programme pupils at Leytonstone Secondary School will see the building refurbished and a relocation and new build with two new classes is planned for Willowfield Secondary school in Walthamstow.


 
Willow Brook SchoolFigures released by the Department of Education show 60 per cent of pupils at all but two schools in the borough are reaching the required level. The government has raised the floor level target for reading, writing and mathematics tests taken before starting secondary school, with 60 per cent of pupils required to reach level 4, combined with measures on progress. On average, 61 per cent of pupils in the borough reached the required standard, but Willow Brook and Dawlish primary schools, both in Leyton, fell well below the target with 31 per cent and 46 per cent respectively. read ...
 
Speaking Out: Kiri Tunks on free schools and academies
17th December 2013
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A secondary school teacher living in Waltham Forest speaks out about the problem of the growing number of free schools and academies
Kiri Tunks Kiri Tunks is a mother and secondary school teacher living in Waltham Forest. Ms Tunks has been a teacher for 20 years and is concerned about the growing number of free schools and academies cropping up across the borough.
 
lbwfAs part of our drive to create a better place to live we are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future. To accommodate an increase in demand for primary school places and provide decent school buildings we are carrying out work to some primary schools in the borough as part of a multi-million investment programme. WilshawOfsted chief, Sir Michael Wilshaw, says England's schools failing white working-class children. Ofsted will launch an online tool to highlight the often stark differences in school and college performance between local authority areas that share similar demographic characteristics.
Nutshell Council statement on education - Sep 2013
September 2013
We are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future
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Waltham Forest News

As part of our drive to create a better place to live we are investing in schools to give our children the best chance of a bright future. To accommodate an increase in demand for primary school places and provide decent school buildings we are carrying out work to some primary schools in the borough as part of a multi-million investment programme.
Works will vary at each school and range from major construction work, such as extensions, to small adaptations to existing buildings. Twenty-two schools will receive some form of building work, these include:
  • Buxton Primary School in Leytonstone has undergone internal improvements to the classroom area and has more toilets
  • To cater for additional pupil places George Mitchell Primary School in Leyton is modifying the building internally to create an additional classroom
  • Parkside Primary School in Chingford has also benefited from internal changes to increase classroom space
  • Major construction work is taking place at St Saviours C of E Primary School in Walthamstow. Pupils will benefit from a new reception class, medical room, kitchen, hall and library

As part of Waltham Forest's secondary school programme pupils at Leytonstone Secondary School will see the building refurbished and a relocation and new build with two new classes is planned for Willowfield Secondary school in Walthamstow.


 
GoogleGoogle chairman Eric Schmidt said:
Education in Britain is holding back the country's chances of success in the digital media economy.
Nutshell Google's Eric Schmidt criticises education in the UK
26 August 2011
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Eric Schmidt said that the internet is transforming the way television works
Google chairman Eric Schmidt has said education in Britain is holding back the country's chances of success in the digital media economy.
He made his comments at the MacTaggart Lecture at the Edinburgh International Television Festival.
Dr Schmidt said the UK needed to reignite children's passion for science, engineering and maths.
And he announced a partnership with the UK's National Film and TV School, to help train young online film-makers.
Dr Schmidt told the audience of broadcasters and producers that Britain had invented many items but were no longer the world's leading exponents in these fields.
He said: "If I may be so impolite, your track record isn't great.
"The UK is home of so many media-related inventions. You invented photography. You invented TV. You invented computers in both concept and practice.
"It's not widely known, but the world's first office computer was built in 1951 by Lyons' chain of tea shops. Yet today, none of the world's leading exponents in these fields are from the UK."
Television transformed
He said he had been flabbergasted to learn that computer science was not taught as standard in UK schools, despite what he called the "fabulous initiative" in the 1980s when the BBC not only broadcast programmes for children about coding, but shipped over a million BBC Micro computers into schools and homes.
"Your IT curriculum focuses on teaching how to use software, but gives no insight into how it's made. That is just throwing away your great computing heritage," he said.
He said the UK needed to bring art and science back together, as it had in the "glory days of the Victorian era" when Lewis Carroll wrote one of the classic fairy tales, Alice in Wonderland, and was also a mathematics tutor at Oxford.
Dr Schmidt said the internet was transforming television, even though people still spent much more time with TV than the web.
Money shared
The TV and the internet screens were converging, he said, and a social layer was being added to TV shows through Twitter and chat forums.
He denied claims by Rupert Murdoch and others that Google was a parasite, taking billions of pounds in advertising without investing in content - saying that last year it shared $6bn worldwide with its publishing partners including newspapers and broadcasters.
He also said Google was a friend, not a foe, of television.
"Trust me - if you gave people at Google free rein to produce TV you'd end up with a lot of bad sci-fi," he said.
He also reassured television bosses over copyright violations, saying Google could take down sites from its search system within four hours if there were problems.
Dr Schmidt is the first non-broadcaster to give the landmark lecture, which is dedicated to the memory of actor and producer James MacTaggart.
It has previously been delivered by some of the most prominent names in broadcasting including Jeremy Paxman, Mark Thompson, and Rupert Murdoch and his son James.

 
Androulla Vassiliou, Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth Androulla Vassiliou,
Commissioner for Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth
"I want to encourage reading in school, at home, on buses, on trains, in the street. We need to address illiteracy wherever and in whatever form it occurs to give young people a better future."
 
EUA new study published by the European Commission today shows what countries are doing to improve reading literacy - and where they are falling short.
NutshellOne in five 15 year olds and many adults in Europe cannot read properly
eu groupOne in five 15 year olds and many adults in Europe cannot read properly.
11 July 2011
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A new study published by the European Commission today shows what countries are doing to improve reading literacy - and where they are falling short.
The study, which covers 31 countries (EU Member States, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Turkey), reveals that while most have made progress in developing literacy policies, they often lack focus on the groups most at risk, such as boys, children from disadvantaged households and migrant children.
EU Education Ministers have set a target to reduce the share of poor readers from 20% to less than 15% by 2020. Only Belgium (Flemish Community), Denmark, Estonia, Finland and Poland have already achieved this target.

 
Stella Creasy MP“The only form of new school I would actively support would be a Cooperative Trust school” - Stella Creasy’s position on new schools in Walthamstow
Nutshell Stella Creasy's statement in full
Monday, 22 April 2013
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Following a correspondence with supporters of Waltham Forest Defend State Schools, our local MP Stella Creasy has written to us with a statement that clarifies her position. The statement is copied in full and unedited, at her request, below. If you want to read it ahead of our comment, skip to the bottom now.
Here a few immediate observations.
Firstly, her message also makes clear her view that the government will not allow a new local community school to be built in Walthamstow. This is not in itself news. We have acknowledged this all along. However, disappointingly, she doesn’t address the possibility that the shortfall could be addressed by expanding existing schools, nor the fact that there is good evidence that this would be preferable in educational terms to building a new smaller school. In fact, publicly-available data show the forecast shortfall of secondary school places in the Borough as equivalent to 10 classes by 2016/17. This can be solved by expansion of our current Ofsted-rated  'good' or 'outstanding' secondary schools.'
Secondly, it is very significant that Stella states clearly that she will only give her active support to a Co-Operative Trust school. This is important because a Co-operative school is a very different model of school to either a Free School or an Academy. Co-op schools are founded on a Trust model that locks in community assets and gives a more democratic say to a school’s many stakeholders. This is very different from a Free School or an Academy in which the private sponsor appoints the majority of each school's governing body, and where academies are often closely supervised from head office. See this article for more details: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/aug/15/cooperative-schools-antidote-academies-independent
A co-operative school has a weaker relationship to local authorities than a community school but it would be markedly superior in protecting the interests of the community, parents and teachers to the kind of top-down, privatised schooling offered by either an Academy or a Free school.
Supporters of our community schools will have a range of views on Co-Operative Trust Schools, but it is apparent from this that our MP is not actively supporting either of the Free School proposals. We thank her for making this clear.

Here is Stella’s statement in full:
“The data regarding school places provided by the local authority creates a compelling case that Walthamstow faces a substantial shortage of school places in our area within the next few years- as those involved in the 1200 places campaign will be aware, Walthamstow residents have sought consistently to make the case to the Government that this need should be addressed as a matter of urgency to ensure that no child who lives in Walthamstow is without the opportunity of education in their local environment.
Since 2010 this case has become stronger, not weaker. The growth of the population not just in Walthamstow but in our city as a whole combined with changes to benefits and housing costs are bringing more people to our area and will continue to do so in the years ahead. If we are to meet the need for school places without compromising standards in existing schools, especially at secondary school level, then Walthamstow will need new schools as well as increased capacity in our existing establishments. Having been on the Education Bill and argued this matter through with the Government ministers as well as lobbied through the 1200 pupils campaign I'm now convinced that the Government will not enable community schools to be built, even to meet such a specific and identified need.
Given the restrictions that this Government has put on the options available to communities to address this need for places, Walthamstow faces some critical choices about the future needs of our children. Under the current legislation as the local MP I have no authority to promote or prevent any new schools, as approval for such provision will be the decision of the Department for Education alone. However, given how important this issue is for the future of provision and educational standards in Walthamstow I will continue to seek to meet with, work with and hold to account all those who are active in planning for educational provision in our area. To do otherwise risks failing our local young people who need these places and should be our prime concern as well as wasting vital public resources. I will also continue to seek to work with our existing local schools and the local authority in promoting school standards in our area.
In addition to this, as both a Labour and Co-operative MP I am passionate about the role of all stakeholders in education- pupils, parents, teachers, governors and the wider community. That is why in approaching the debates around the future structures of education in our community and the provision of new schools in our area, I have been clear that the only form of new school I would actively support would be a Cooperative Trust school. I have set out this test to all those who have approached me seeking help- both to create new schools as well as oppose them- and will continue to promote these values.
I recognise there are strong views as to the benefits and shortcomings of various models for school provision. The reality and urgency for all those who care about the future attainment of young people in Walthamstow is that we cannot avoid the question of how best to ensure we have the school places to the standards our children need in our community. I therefore welcome the commitment of all those in our local community to engaging in this question and the passion that they show for the educational attainment of all local children. I hope others will do the same.”
Stella Creasy

 
pisaPisa tests: UK stagnates as Shanghai tops league table
The UK fails to make the top 20 in any subject in international tests taken by 15-year-olds while Shanghai in China tops the league. 1743
What are the Pisa tests?
International tests in maths, reading and science
Tests are taken by 500,000 15 year old pupils in 65 countries and local administrations
They are run every three years by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
In the UK, more than 12,000 pupils took the tests in 2012
Try the Pisa test yourself
NutshellUK 'stagnates' in global school test
pisa3 December 2013
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The UK is falling behind global rivals in international tests taken by 15-year-olds, failing to make the top 20 in maths, reading and science.
England's Education Secretary Michael Gove said since the 1990s, test performances had been "at best stagnant, at worst declining".
Shanghai in China is the top education system in the OECD's Pisa tests.
Within the UK, Scotland outperformed England at maths and reading, but Wales is below average in all subjects.
Mr Gove told MPs that his reforms, such as changing the curriculum, school autonomy and directing financial support towards poorer pupils, were designed to prevent schools in England from "falling further behind".
He highlighted the rapid improvements that had been made in countries such as Poland, Germany and Vietnam.
Shadow Education Secretary Tristram Hunt called on Mr Gove to take some responsibility for the lack of progress and said the results showed that collaboration between schools and teachers was more effective than market forces.
'Extremely sobering'
Graham Stuart, chair of the education select committee, said the results were "extremely sobering" and showed that "we went nowhere" despite massive investment in schools.
But the Pisa results should not be used to "talk down our public education system", said Chris Keates, leader of the NASUWT teachers' union, who argued that high performing countries were those which promoted the professionalism of teachers.
In response to the particularly poor results in Wales, Education Minister Huw Lewis said: "Everybody working in and around the Welsh education sector needs to take a long hard look in the mirror."
Sir Michael Barber, chief education adviser for education company Pearson and former Downing Street adviser, said the test result "focuses minds in education ministries around the world like nothing else".
The Pisa tests - the Programme for International Student Assessment - have become the most influential rankings in international education, based on tests taken by more than 500,000 secondary school pupils.
These measure education standards in Europe, North and South America, Australasia and parts of the Middle East and Asia.
Tunisia was the only African country that participated.
The top places in the rankings are dominated by Asian school systems - although China so far does not participate as a whole country, but is represented by high-performing cities such as Shanghai and Hong Kong.
In the next set of Pisa tests it is expected that China will be entered as a whole country.
Shanghai's maths score is the equivalent of three years' schooling above the OECD average.
Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan are among the highest ranked across all subjects.
The OECD's Andreas Schleicher, in charge of the Pisa tests, has highlighted Vietnam's "star performance".
The South East Asian country has entered the top 10 for science and outperformed many much wealthier western education systems, including the United States.
UK slips in science
The UK has made little progress and remains among the average, middle-ranking countries, in 26th place for maths and 23rd for reading, broadly similar to three years ago.
But the UK has slipped in science from 16th to 21st place.
Although not directly comparable, because there have been different numbers of countries taking part, this marks a sustained decline, with the UK having ranked 4th in the tests taken in 2000.
Much of this falling behind has been caused by other countries improving more quickly.
The OECD figures show that there has been almost no change in the UK's test scores, with the results "flat lining".
Within the UK, Scotland has performed slightly better than England in maths and reading, with England higher for science. Northern Ireland is behind them both across all subjects.
But the biggest gap is between Wales and the other parts of the UK, adrift from most of the middle ranking western countries.
Happiest pupils
The lowest ranked countries in this international league table are Peru and Indonesia. The OECD says the gap between top and bottom of this global classroom is the equivalent of six years of learning.
However Indonesia also appears as the country where the highest proportion of children say they are happiest at school. And the least happy pupils are in high-performing South Korea.
Finland, once an education superpower at the top of the rankings, has slipped downwards. Along with Sweden, Finland had the biggest fall in scores of any country in maths tests.
Sweden has fallen behind eastern and central European countries such as Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Estonia.
But Finland still has the highest position of any European country, fifth in science, the only non-Asian country in any of the top fives.
Among the strongest performances by English-speaking countries are Ireland, ranked 7th in reading, and Canada ranked 10th in science.
Chile is the strongest performer among South American countries, above the lowest-performing European country, Albania.
How regions compare
These Pisa tests provide an increasing level of regional detail and they show the huge variation within a single country.
In Italy, the region of Trento is one of the best in the world at maths, but Calabria is far below many European countries, the equivalent of two years behind.
The US remains average or below average, below countries such as Russia and Spain, but individual states are high performers.
If Massachusetts was ranked as a country it would be sixth best in the world, ahead of any European country.
From a low base in previous years, one of the biggest improvers in maths and reading is Qatar, a country that has been a high-profile investor in education.
Katja Hall, the chief policy director of the CBI employers' organisation, said: "No issue matters more to the UK economy over the long term than the quality of our education system."
But she warned the results should be a "wake-up call" and that when UK schools are only "treading water" that the country's economic performance will suffer.
"High-performing schools are the best way to support economic growth and greater opportunity."
The OECD's secretary general, Angel Gurria, launching the results in Washington in the US, said: "It's more urgent than ever that young people learn the skills they need to succeed.
"In a global economy, competitiveness and future job prospects will depend on what people can do with what they know. Young people are the future, so every country must do everything it can to improve its education system and the prospects of future generations."

 
The Local Government Association has predicted primary school capacity in Waltham Forest will need to increase by 25 per cent in three years. This is one of the largest expected shortfalls in England and Wales
Stella  Creasy MPStella Creasy
MP for Walthamstow:

Waltham Forest is facing a devastating shortfall in its capacity to provide school places as our local birthrate is rising and more people are moving here with their families.
She asks residents to help lobby the Government to address a funding shortfall that could see upto 1200 children in Waltham Forest without a local school place by 2015.
Councillor Clare CoghillCouncillor Clare Coghill, cabinet member for children, reassures that plans are in place to ensure enough places are available.
She said: “This is a problem facing schools across the country and Waltham Forest has plans in place to meet the need both now and in the future."
NutshellWF is facing a devastating shortfall
Stella Creasy, MP for Walthamstow launches campaign for local school funding
September 2013
Press release:
Stella Creasy, MP for Walthamstow, is asking residents to help lobby the Government to address a funding shortfall that could see upto 1200 children in Waltham Forest without a local school place by 2015.
Speaking after hosting a meeting of parents, headteachers and school governers to launch the “1200 Pupils” campaign, Stella said:
“Waltham Forest is facing a devastating shortfall in its capacity to provide school places as our local birthrate is rising and more people are moving here with their families. Without additional capital funding, as many as 1,200 pupils could be unable to attend schools in the area by 2015. Government ministers have not been clear about how they plan to address this issue, and additional funds are needed now so our community can plan for and provide the school places needed not just in the coming years but in the longer term as well.”
“The Government is currently consulting on how to provide funding for school places- this campaign is calling on them not just to provide the money for the pupil but also for the school buildings required too as without the space to teach them in there’s a risk the quality of education at our local schools could be compromised. Thank you to all the parents, staff and governors who have expressed support for the campaign – you can find details of how to help out on my website at www.workingforwalthamstow.org.uk.”
The campaign launch took place on Monday 3 October at Mission Grove School. In attendance along with Stella was Cllr Clare Coghill and around 40 headteachers, parents and governors. Speaking about the campaign Cllr Coghill said:
“As a local councillor and a governor at two local primaries, I am acutely aware of the need to provide more school places and the pressure that this places on schools. This campaign aims to get the best for our children and after the excellent launch event this week, I am sure that it will have an impact when the Government considers its approach to school place funding- I hope residents will support this campaign by writing or emailing the consultation which closes on Tuesday 11 October 2011″
ENDS

Notes
•The government is currently in the process of consulting on school funding. The funding allocated by the Department for Education allocates money on the basis of the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) which funds provisions on a pupil-by-pupil basis. At present, the DSG does not take into account the provision of physical space in which to provide the places it funds. The cancellation of the Building Schools for the Future programme (BSF) by the Government affected nineteen schools in Waltham Forest. BSF would have helped address the need for school places by delivering funding for the space to provide an extra fourteen forms of entry across the borough in existing schools. It would also have provided for a completely new secondary school scheduled to open in 2015 that would have provided up to 900 extra places.
• This issue is not only confined to Waltham Forest, but affects boroughs across London. According to London Councils, it is estimated that there will be over 100,000 extra pupils in London schools by 2015 with a shortage of 70,000 places. Those wishing to support the “1200 Pupils” campaign can respond to the government’s consultation by sending an email on the subject to schoolfunding.consultation@education.gsi.gov.uk before the deadline of Tuesday 11 October 2011. Stella Creasy’s office can provide a draft text for this email – you can contact the office on 0208 521 1223.
• For more information on the 1200 Pupils Campaign contact Will Brett at: will@workingforwalthamstow.org.uk tel: 0208 521 1223/ 07979 696 265

Nutshell plans to ensure enough places are available.
Severe shortage of primary school places
7th September 2013
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There will be a severe shortage of primary school places in Waltham Forest by 2016, according to research published this week.
The borough has seen a rapid expansion of schools over the past few years to meet rising demand, with many having temporary classrooms installed.
Despite this, the Local Government Association has predicted primary school capacity in Waltham Forest will need to increase by 25 per cent in three years.
This is one of the largest expected shortfalls in England and Wales. 
But Councillor Clare Coghill, cabinet member for children, has moved to reassure parents that plans are in place to ensure enough places are available.
She said: “This is a problem facing schools across the country and Waltham Forest has plans in place to meet the need both now and in the future.
“Providing every child in the borough with a good education is a priority for the council and we are ensuring that they all have a place in a good quality school.
"We currently have enough spaces within our schools and are planning for the future."
She added that authorities face an additional challenge because they no longer have the power to create new schools and must rely on the establishment of free schools.
Related links

Four new free schools were approved in the borough in May, including the new Walthamstow Primary Academy which will be run by United Learning.
But opponents say free schools are not the answer.
Jonathan White, of campaign group Our Community, Our Schools, said the shortage of primary school places has been caused by the government channelling money, time and effort into promoting free schools.
“A free-for-all, where schools are left to govern themselves, is a recipe for creating an anarchic market in which some schools will succeed and some will fail,” he said.


 
Top news
care homeThe CQC has found that homes owned by Blak Rock Ltd are failing residents
5th October 2013
Nutshell Waltham Forest Care Homes
The CQC has found that homes owned by Blak Rock Ltd are failing residents
5th October 2013
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A care company has been ordered to make changes after two of its homes were heavily criticised. Last week the Care Quality Commission published a report on Lakeside House Residential Care Home in Leytonstone, outlining failings at the site.
However it is Ashbridge Lodge in Ashbridge Road, Leytonstone, which has been most heavily criticised.The home which specialises in care for people with learning disabilities is currently under review by the CQC.
Lotus Lodge, Leytonstone, is not meeting national standards in two areas according to inspectors
14th July 2013
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Alliston House in Walthamstow was found to be meeting all national standards
3rd April 2013
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A care home has been praised following a random inspection from the Care Quality Commission. Alliston House, Church Hill Road, Walthamstow was inspected earlier this year and was found to be meeting all national care standards.
The regulating body for health and social care in England, the CQC, found that residents at the home were treated well by staff.
An inspector said: “We found people were treated with respect and dignity, those who spoke with us felt they received good care and treatment.”
Standards including safety, respect and patient protection were assessed by the inspectors.
The owner of The Grove, Walthamstow, has defended his care home following the CQC's report
4th April 2013
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A care home has been slammed by the Care Quality Commission after a random inspection was carried out earlier this year. The Grove in Walthamstow was criticised after inspectors found that correct procedure had not been followed when residents were in danger.

 
Top news
StonewallStonewall's Education Champions
Stonewall's Education Champions programme provides bespoke support and guidance to local authorities in tackling homophobia and homophobic bullying in their local schools.
Including:  Primary and Secondary schools, Further education, Teacher Training, Local authorities, Education Champions, Stonewall Education Equality Index, Parents and carers, Youth workers
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Cllr BeanNew campaign urges people to report suspected abuse in Waltham Forest
5th March 2013
"Anyone can be guilty of abuse, whether they are relatives, friends, neighbours, carers or voluntary staff." - read ...
childlineVolunteers from the helpline ChildLine are planning to visit every UK primary school at least once every two years to teach children about abuse. The new NSPCC campaign called Now I Know aims to teach nine to 11-year-olds about self-protection and getting help. NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said the Jimmy Savile case showed what happened if people did not "speak up".
NutshellChildLine to teach all UK primary schools about abuse
The NSPCC wants children to "speak out earlier and protect themselves"
16 September 2013
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Volunteers from the helpline ChildLine are planning to visit every UK primary school at least once every two years to teach children about abuse.
The new NSPCC campaign called Now I Know aims to teach nine to 11-year-olds about self-protection and getting help.
NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said the Jimmy Savile case showed what happened if people did not "speak up".
On average, two children in every primary class have suffered some form of abuse or neglect, the charity said.
Mr Wanless said: "We want children to be able to say 'now I know' - and not 'I wish I had known'. And we want everyone to play their part by looking out for children and reinforcing the messages about speaking up.
"Jimmy Savile's crimes are one shocking illustration of the consequences when people do not speak up and are not heard, for whatever reason."
The NSPCC has previously said Savile, who died in 2011, had been one of the most prolific sex offenders in its 129-year history.
'Inspire everyone'
According to ChildLine, the majority of children who contact its helpline are aged over 11, but many speak about abuse which happened months or years earlier.
A study carried out by YouGov for the NSPCC showed just 36% of UK adults thought they would have recognised abuse if it had happened to them at primary school age.
It also found 38% of those polled said they would have known who to ask for help at that age.
Mr Wanless said the charity wanted to "inspire everyone to believe" child abuse - which can include physical, sexual and emotional abuse - can be prevented.
"Protection after the event, vital as it is, can't attack the root causes of the problem," he said.
"By helping children understand and identify abuse in an age-appropriate way, we can encourage them to speak out earlier and protect themselves and others from the devastating effects of abuse."
The ChildLine Schools Service, which is free to all UK primary schools, has visited 270,895 children in 3,956 schools so far.
Separately, almost 50,000 people have signed a petition calling for a new law forcing people who work with children to report suspected child abuse.
The petition will be handed to 10 Downing Street later ahead of the publication this week of the serious case review into the murder of four-year-old Daniel Pelka by his mother and stepfather in 2012.

 
Mark ThompsonBBC told to put more gay presenters on children's TV to 'familiarise' youngsters with different sexualities
05 Jun 2013
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Study said gay presenters would 'validate' the feelings of gay children. It said this was important for young people in their ' formative years.' Report said BBC News gave too much time to 'homophobic' viewpoints. It also recommended having more gay characters in dramas and soaps.
 
ELOPWalthamstow pupils secure £3,000 for LGBT charity East London Out Project
18th June 2013
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A charity supporting LGBT people in east London was chosen as the recipient of a £3,000 donation after pupils argued its case in a school project.
The East London Out Project (ELOP) will receive the cash after pupils at Frederick Bremer School in Siddeley Road, Walthamstow, persuaded judges to pick the charity as part of a philanthropy project.
The 13 and 14-year-olds worked in groups with a chosen charity each and discovered what differences they made to the area. The groups then made their presentations before six judges including Cllr Clare Coghill, cabinet member for children’s services.
 
OfstedGood practice resource - A whole-school approach to tackling homophobic bullying and ingrained attitudes: Stoke Newington School and Sixth Form
03 Feb 2012
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Stoke Newington has a curriculum which meets the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students (LGBT) and extends all students’ understanding of diversity. Training for all staff, their commitment to equality and diversity and their approach to poor behaviour have successfully tackled homophobic language, attitudes and bullying.
 
Top childrens services
Connaught school strikeA headteacher has said she does not trust Waltham Forest Council to safeguard the future of her school – as a row over its bid to become an academy deepens.
NutshellWaltham Forest Childrens Services
Mission Grove Children's CentreMission Grove Children's Centre in Walthamstow rated 'inadequate' by Ofsted.
9th August 2012
Inspectors said the situation at Mission Grove Children's Centre, in Buxton Road, Walthamstow, was so confusing they had to ask the council "to immediately clarify who is in charge”.
Connaught school strikeSchool & council row over academy plans
23rd October 2012
A headteacher has said she does not trust Waltham Forest Council to safeguard the future of her school – as a row over its bid to become an academy deepens.
Connaught school strikeTeachers strike at Leytonstone school as last-ditch talks fail
7th November 2012
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TEACHERS at a popular all-girls school have started a two day strike after last-ditch talks failed.
National Union of Teachers (NUT) members at Connaught School for Girls in Leytonstone are holding the walk-out in protest at its bid to become an academy.
It is the third strike over the issue to close the school this term.
Waltham Forest NUT secretary Steve White said: "It's very likely we will see more strikes in future.
"The union will support whatever its members want to do and I think it is almost certain."
Connaught school strikeConnaught School for Girls, in Leytonstone, becomes an academy after fierce union battle
5th February 2013
A high-achieving school has finally become an academy after a long battle with its unionised staff.

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) held ten days of strikes at Connaught School for Girls, in Leytonstone, last year in protest at the plans.
Headteacher Ann Betts said the move was necessary to prevent Waltham Forest Council from merging it with another school, and she also said Connaught would be £97,000 better off as a result.
OfstedAnnual assessment of children's services 2011
November 2011
Children’s services in the London Borough of Waltham Forest perform poorly. Performance was adequate in 2010..
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WF Guardian Ofsted assessment of children's services 2011
November 2011
WALTHAM Forest Council's children and young people services department is one of the worst in the country, according to watchdog Ofsted
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Annual Ofsted assessment of children's services December 2010
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Summary
  • The Children’s Service meets only minimum requirements
  • Re-offending rates have increased, as have the number of first time offenders.
  • Fixed-term exclusions remain very high.
  • Higher than average numbers of young women under the age of 18 become pregnant
  • The number of young people taking part in sporting or arts activities or a youth group has fallen in the last year and is much lower than in similar areas or the rest of England.
  • Fewer 19-year-olds obtain qualifications than in similar areas or the rest of England and in 2009 the gap widened.
 
Top news
WilshawSir Michael Wilshaw is expected to blame low expectations and problems recruiting good teachers Many of the poor children being left behind in schools now are in suburbs, market towns and seaside resorts rather than big cities, England's chief inspector of schools is to say.
Nutshell'Invisible' poor children let down by schools, says Ofsted head
19 June 2013
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Sir Michael Wilshaw is expected to blame low expectations and problems recruiting good teachers
Many of the poor children being left behind in schools now are in suburbs, market towns and seaside resorts rather than big cities, England's chief inspector of schools is to say.
In a speech, Sir Michael Wilshaw will say such pupils are often an "invisible minority" in schools rated good or outstanding in quite affluent areas.
He wants a new team of "National Service Teachers" sent in to help.
'Unseen children'
"Today, many of the disadvantaged children performing least well in school can be found in leafy suburbs, market towns or seaside resorts," he is expected to say in a speech in London.
"Often they are spread thinly, as an 'invisible minority' across areas that are relatively affluent.
"These poor, unseen children can be found in mediocre schools the length and breadth of our country. They are labelled, buried in lower sets, consigned as often as not to indifferent teaching.
"They coast through education until, at the earliest opportunity, they sever their ties with it."
Sir Michael told the Today programme that many of the 1.2 million children in England on free school meals were not doing well and that "two thirds of these are white British children".
In a report, he will make recommendations aimed at closing the achievement gap between rich and poor.
"National Service Teachers", he will say, should be employed by central government to teach in "schools in parts of the country that are currently failing their most disadvantaged pupils".
And he will call for smaller, "sub-regional" versions of the London Challenge, the initiative which ran in the capital in the 2000s and is credited with turning around many schools.
Under this Labour policy, schools were encouraged to help each other, with successful schools, heads and teachers working with those in less successful schools with similar intakes and circumstances.

 
Paolo Ramella33 members of staff at Sir George Monoux College look likely to strike
Paolo Ramella, Principal of Sir George Monoux College.
30th September 2013
Nutshell Sir George Monoux College
Paolo Ramella33 members of staff at Sir George Monoux College look likely to strike on Thursday
30th September 2013
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The National Union of Teachers last week called on members at the Chingford Road college to strike over what it says is the victimisation of NUT representatives and the “groundless” dismissal of the NUT’s Health & Safety representative at the college. Further information is not known at this stage.
The college says the strike is planned in response to an on-going disciplinary matter with one member of staff. 33 members of the NUT at the college voted in favour of strike action.
Paolo Ramella, Principal of the college, said: “We are disappointed that the NUT has voted for strike action, which the college feels is ill-advised and unnecessary. “The strike has been called prematurely in response to a disciplinary matter that has now yet reached a conclusion, as an appeal hearing is still pending.” He added that in the event of any strike action the college will remain open and as many possible lessons will take place. The college says any students affected will have access to learning resources and facilities.
Monoiux CollegeFour teenagers arrested over axe fight at Sir George Monoux College in Walthamstow have bail extended
24th April 2013
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Four teenagers arrested after an axe fight broke out in a college have had their bail extended.
No-one was injured in the fight which led to the arrest of a 19-year-old student on suspicion of possessing an offensive weapon at Sir George Monoux College in Chingford Road, Walthamstow on January 31.
Three other 19-year-olds were arrested on suspicion of affray after the fight broke out in the canteen.
The four were released on bail until March 12, when their bail was extended until April 22. It has now been extended again until June 5.
College principal Paolo Ramella has moved to reassure students and parents that the college puts the safety of its students first and insists the college is safe.
Paolo RamellaPrincipal of Sir George Monoux College moves to reassure parents and students it is safe after axe fight
2nd February 2013
Comment by technomist @ 2013-02-03 – 13:32:01
I am glad I am not at school. Or running one. A local headmaster is said to be trying to reassure parents that all is well at his school, despite an axe being brandished on the premises during a fight in the canteen - an axe which the school apparently had metal detectors installed to prevent materialising. The head, Mr Paolo Ramilla, says that the school, along with a few other local schools, also has 24-hour security cameras, regular anti-crime conferences and employs guards as security staff.
The school had an illustrious past. I say 'had' because as it is operating now I think people are entitled to question its right to a future. As Sir George Monoux grammar school, it produced such luminaries as Sir Alan Roy Fersht FRS, (the Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge), Sir John Dankworth and Sir Fred Pontin. No doubt there were young chaps who threw their weight about and fights took place there in the past, (indeed, I have a friend who went to the school who has a wealth of stories on the subject) but I bet that students would not have needed to be passed through metal detectors to see if they were carrying axes.
The headmaster, trying to give comfort to the parents and public reckons that despite his not knowing how the axe got into the school(in my day schools had teachers, dinner ladies, prefects and discipline, so what do I know) he will eventually find out with the help of the cctv cameras.
“I don’t think this incident indicates it’s not safe. We put the students at the centre of everything we do and they told us themselves in a survey that they feel safe here.”
In my day they did not have to survey children to see if they felt safe or not. They were. But I went to an unusual place where everyone had to experience full contact sports and 11 years olds could even learn how to box before graduating to pointing swords at each other. From 13, we could tackle assault courses and have some fun shooting live ammunition while learning how to be disciplined about weapons. Here in Walthamstow, such activities are sadly extra-curricular.
The Monoux school's website reveals that the school has a student council which, tellingly in my view, had to ask the college for the provision of benches, tables, plants and flowers as places 'where students chat happily together', as if that was considered in some way unusual - and was not in the school's original plans as to how things should be being run.
Despite these innovations, the school, which has been grandly rebranded a 'college' and an 'investor in people' is as likely nowadays to make news in the crime pages as for the achievements of its chess club. I have no idea how much a snow job the school is attempting on the parents and public, but I do note that the photographs of the gym on the college's politically correct website appears to suggest that working out in there is only something indulged in by females.

 
Free schoolsCampaigners supporting Waltham Forest’s state schools have criticised the approval process behind free schools in the wake of the announcement of four new free schools this morning.
NutshellFree school approval process criticised
22nd May 2013
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Campaigners supporting Waltham Forest’s state schools have criticised the approval process behind free schools in the wake of the announcement of four new free schools this morning.
Jonathan White, 39, campaigner and father of two, has previously opposed the opening of both the Oasis Community Learning school and Tauheedul Free Schools, listed as Waltham Forest Leadership Academy for Girls.
Mr White learned this morning, however, that two additional free schools were granted approval and said the lack of public consultation to this point is ‘crazy’.
The father of two, whose daughter attends Henry Maynard School and who lives on Cromwell Road, added that two of the schools which have now been approved were unknown to him before today, which flies in the face of the usual consultation and approval processes.
He said: “It’s crazy there’s no transparent process for consultation to this point.
“Any other major body would have to submit a proposal and have a consultation, but these rules don’t apply when opening a school.”
He notes on the group’s website that if full details of applications are not made public until after the Department of Education gives approval it cannot be said that their decision took account of local concerns in any meaningful sense.


ofstedOfsted says that only a good standard of education is acceptable for the youngest children
Nurseries and childminders in England that require improvement will have just two years to achieve an Ofsted "good" rating, the watchdog says.
Nutshell Ofsted gives nurseries two years to reach 'good' level

2 August 2013
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Ofsted says that only a good standard of education is acceptable for the youngest children
Nurseries and childminders in England that require improvement will have just two years to achieve an Ofsted "good" rating, the watchdog says.
From November the current "satisfactory" judgement will be replaced by "requires improvement" for early years providers
Any that do not "get to good" in the time frame will face the prospect of being judged "inadequate", Ofsted says.
The Pre-school Learning Alliance voiced "serious concerns" about the plan.
Ofsted chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw said: "The early years are crucial. That's why only a good standard of education and care is acceptable for our youngest children."
'Strong opinion'
The new system will bring the inspection judgements for early years providers into line with schools and colleges, with four inspection levels: "outstanding", "good", "requires improvement" and "inadequate".
The move follows a consultation this year, the results of which are published to coincide with the announcement.

Two years is a long time in a child's life and it's long enough for a setting to improve... four years is too long to wait for a nursery to reach the good standard that every child deserves”
Sir Michael Wilshaw Chief inspector

The report, Good Early Years Provision For All, summarises the outcomes of the consultation, which received more than 2,500 responses from childcare professionals, parents and carers.
Ofsted says the consultation revealed that the "overwhelmingly strong opinion" of parents and carers was that two years was too long to wait for improvements in education provision for very young children.
"Two years is a long time in a child's life and it's long enough for a setting to improve," said Sir Michael.
"I agree with the parents who told us in our consultation that four years is too long to wait for a nursery to reach the good standard that every child deserves."
Ofsted figures for last year showed that the majority of England's nurseries and childminders were judged "good" (62%) or "outstanding" (12%) by inspectors - but 25% were judged "satisfactory", and 1% classed as "inadequate".
Sir Michael said some providers were not improving fast enough between inspections, particularly in poorer areas.
"Too many pre-schools and nurseries across the country are not yet good, particularly in the most deprived areas."
Neil Leitch, chief executive of the Pre-school Learning Alliance, said: "The sector is growing more concerned by the day about the unfairness of Ofsted inspections, with an increasing number of childcare providers having their rating downgraded.
'Catastrophic'
"Unless Ofsted acts to sort this out, what is intended to move the sector towards higher standards could end up being unfairly detrimental to some settings."

Neither Ofsted nor local authorities presently have the resources to deliver the intensive mentoring that many of these [early years] providers need”
Jill Rutter Family and Childcare Trust

Mr Leitch added that Ofsted's focus on areas of deprivation risked "the devastation of childcare services in these areas, where they are needed most", which could be "catastrophic".
Purnima Tanuku, of the National Day Nurseries Association, said inspections needed to be more "robust, consistent and accurate" to gain providers' confidence.
Ms Tanuku added that the changes would mean that the "good" category would become "very broad... making the need for transparency on the way judgements are made absolutely vital".
Jill Rutter, of the Family and Childcare Trust, said that Ofsted had failed "to clarify how early years providers that are graded as 'inadequate' or 'requiring improvement' will be helped to improve.
"Neither Ofsted nor local authorities presently have the resources to deliver the intensive mentoring that many of these providers need."
The watchdog says it will publish a new inspection framework for early years providers in September and the first inspections under the new system will start in November.


 
classroomMore than half of Waltham Forest schoolchildren in in primary and secondary schools, as well as special schools and pupil referral units, do not speak English as a first language. This is compared to a London average of 38.9 per cent and a national average of 13.6 per cent.
NutshellEnglish is second language for more than half of Waltham Forest schoolchildren
 2nd July 2013
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English is second language for half of Waltham Forest schoolchildren
More than half of Waltham Forest schoolchildren do not speak English as a first language.
Just over 17,000 pupils in the borough do not have English as their native tongue, according to official figures from the Department of Education.
The figure is calculated from pupils in primary and secondary schools, as well as special schools and pupil referral units, but primary schools have the highest number of children who speak a first language other than English.
More than 10,000 primary pupils – or 55.6 per cent – have English as a second language, compared to a London average of 47.5 per cent and a national average of 18.1 per cent.
In secondary schools, 6,625 pupils speak English as a second language, equivalent to 44.2 per cent of those taught in Waltham Forest.
This is compared to a London average of 38.9 per cent and a national average of 13.6 per cent.
The data also shows that of the 19,000 primary school pupils, more than a fifth are entitled to free school meals, a figure which rises to a quarter in secondary school.
Free school meals (FSM) is a key measure of poverty, and the School Food Trust says research suggests it is the one proper meal such a child might get in a day.
However, of the 3,783 secondary school pupils entitled to the free meal, just 2,949 actually have them.

 
Cllr Claire Coghill Just over 17,000 children, 50 per cent of the pupils in the borough, do not speak English as their native tongue. Cabinet member for children’s services Clare Coghill said: “We can have up to 60 languages spoken in a school. Some schools are tackling the problem by teaching English to parents of pupils.
NutshellThousands of schoolchildren 'missing out on English language support'
3rd July 2013
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Thousands of schoolchildren who do not speak English as a first language are less likely to fulfil their potential because they are missing out on vital government funding, it is claimed.
Just over 17,000 children, 50 per cent of the pupils in the borough, do not speak English as their native tongue, according to official figures from the Department of Education.
And critics believe government funding to help the poorest pupils is missing many whose prospects of success are diminished because they do not have access to enough English language support.
Waltham Forest Council estimates it will receive £8.8 million in 2013-14 to work with children who receive free school meals (FSM), to tackle the inequality between their own and other pupils’ learning.
But the National Union of Teachers (NUT) and the council itself have criticised the government for apparently overlooking pupils whose first language is not English, calling for funding to provide them with more support.
Local NUT representative, Steve White, teaches one day a week at Leytonstone School in Colworth Road.
He said: “I have kids in my class who don’t have English at all. There’s a girl who arrived in year eight who didn’t speak any English. She’s chucked in at the deep end.
“She can only select certain lessons where she is supported. It fundamentally affects learning if you can’t understand the lesson – it affects science, maths, everything.”
Cabinet member for children’s services Clare Coghill added that many families of such children do not speak English at home and may not know how to access support such as FSM.
She added: “We can have up to 60 languages spoken in a school and so where pupils used to learn English from their peers, that additional support from assistants is absolutely invaluable.
“However whilst there may be instances of overlap between children new to this country and those on FSM it’s not guaranteed.”
Mrs Coghill claimed children suffer from ‘churn’ too, where they move from school to school without any continuity of support, so their learning is dislocated.
Some schools are tackling the problem by teaching English to parents of pupils, such as at South Grove Primary School, in Ringwood Road, Walthamstow.
The school won a National Award for Adult Education last month for its Learning Together programme.
Extended services manager Brigid Montgomery said: “It does help parents who feel isolated not speaking English form friendships with each other and communicate better with the school.”
A DfE spokeswoman said: “Many schools teach pupils whose first language is not English successfully. Through the school funding formula, councils can provide more support for pupils whose first language is not English for up to three years from when they first enter education."

 
Walthamstow AcademyThe academy, on Billet Road, announced today that it is the first school in the country to achieve the Continuing Professional Learning and Development Silver Award.
The award came after an assessor spent three days in the academy in April and examined the structures the academy has in place for staff development.
nutshellWalthamstow Academy is first in country to win award
28th May 2013
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Walthamstow Academy has been given an award for the training and professional development opportunities offered to staff and the follow-on benefits which follow for the standard of education students receive.
The academy, on Billet Road, announced today that it is the first school in the country to achieve the Continuing Professional Learning and Development Silver Award.
The award came after an assessor spent three days in the academy in April and examined the structures the academy has in place for staff development.
Marking the academy against 125 criteria, in giving the award the assessor cited the academy’s senior leadership’s provision of powerful role models, a strong climate of achievement, commitment and enthusiasm among the staff and a well-defined and visible coaching and mentoring strategy to support staff progress.
Walthamstow Academy Principal Emma Skae said: “I am delighted that the assessor recognised the quality of the professional development opportunities we offer staff and how this is having a positive impact on the achievement of our students.”
She added that the success of the programme was down to the amazing staff and that they now have their sights set on achieving the gold award.
The award is the only national externally assessed Quality Mark specifically for continuous professional development in schools.

 
WF GuardianThree-quarters of children get into first choice school
2nd March 2013
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More than three quarters of children were handed a place at their parents' first choice secondary school in Waltham Forest. A total of 78 per cent of parents successfully applied through Pan-London Co-ordinated Admissions.
 
Lyndon LynchDisappointment over school's sports hall u-turn
19th March 2013
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 A retired teacher has spoken of his disappointment after a school renamed a sports hall in his honour - but then changed its mind due to "sponsorship" reasons.
Highly-respected Lyndon Lynch, 60, said he was delighted and surprised when the accolade was announced at Leytonstone School in Colworth Road. During his 11 years there PE teacher Mr Lynch had helped the school to various sporting successes and was instrumental in securing £20,000 in funding for its fitness suite and a £4million grant which led to the sports hall being built in the first place.
But just days after the renaming ceremony a newly-installed plaque with his name was quietly removed and all references to his name dropped.
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